Among the diseases and viruses that were most prevalent were influenza, typhoid, trench foottrench footTrench foot is a type of foot damage due to moisture. Initial symptoms often include tingling or itching which can progress to numbness. The feet may become red or bluish in color. As the condition worsens the feet can start to swell and smell of decay. Complications may include skin breakdown or infection.

What disease killed soldiers in WW1?

Vaccine successes had been documented for smallpox and typhoid. However, louse-borne typhus killed 2–3 million soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front, and the war’s end in November 1918 was hastened by an influenza pandemic that had begun in January 1918 and eventually claimed the lives of an estimated 50 million.

What was the worst disease in WW1?

It was in the grip of Spanish Influenza, which went on to kill almost three times more people than the 17 million soldiers and civilians killed during WW1.

What health issues did the trenches cause?

What was life like in the trenches? The unsanitary conditions resulted in epidemics of dysentery and the constant presence of parasites, such as scabies and lice, as well as fungal infections. There were no antibiotics, so every wound was potentially fatal through gangrene or other bacterial infections.

How did diseases spread in the trenches?

Trench fever transmission was through body louse, not by bite, but by inoculation of louse feces during scratching. Headaches, severe shin pain with tenderness, splenomegaly, an evanescent rash and a fever that came and went for weeks were its hallmarks.

How was trench fever cured?

Trench Fever is treated with a wide range of antibiotics, including tetracycline, doxycycline, erythromycin, azithromycin, or ceftriaxone. It has been demonstrated, however, that only aminoglycosides have a bactericidal effect on the microorganism (Foucault et al., 2006).

How did soldiers prevent trench fever?

As with typhus on the Eastern Front – a rickettsial disease that killed soldiers – control of lice was the key to managing the epidemic of Trench Fever.

What was the most common death in ww1?

Most of the casualties during WWI are due to war related famine and disease. Civilian deaths due to the Spanish flu have been excluded from these figures, whenever possible.

How was trench mouth treated in ww1?

Doctors treated NUG superficially with hydrogen peroxide, but this condition was below a list of more pressing trench disease priorities such as dysentery, typhoid, and influenza, all of which, without the advanced medicines we have today, killed millions.

What was the biggest cause of death in ww1?

The casualties suffered by the participants in World War I dwarfed those of previous wars: some 8,500,000 soldiers died as a result of wounds and/or disease. The greatest number of casualties and wounds were inflicted by artillery, followed by small arms, and then by poison gas.

What did the trenches smell like?

The stink of war



Stinking mud mingled with rotting corpses, lingering gas, open latrines, wet clothes and unwashed bodies to produce an overpowering stench. The main latrines were located behind the lines, but front-line soldiers had to dig small waste pits in their own trenches.

What are 3 struggles that soldiers faced in the trenches?



The trench experience involved the terror of mud, slime and disease and the constant threat of shellfire.

What were two serious dangers of life in the trenches?

Disease and ‘shell shock’ were rampant in the trenches.



With soldiers fighting in close proximity in the trenches, usually in unsanitary conditions, infectious diseases such as dysentery, cholera and typhoid fever were common and spread rapidly.

What killed most soldiers in ww1?

The casualties suffered by the participants in World War I dwarfed those of previous wars: some 8,500,000 soldiers died as a result of wounds and/or disease. The greatest number of casualties and wounds were inflicted by artillery, followed by small arms, and then by poison gas.

How many soldiers died in ww1 due to disease?

Total losses in combat theaters from 1914–1918 were 876,084, which included 418,361 killed, 167,172 died of wounds, 113,173 died of disease or injury, 161,046 missing and presumed dead and 16,332 prisoner of war deaths.

What was known as soldiers disease?



The Soldier’s Disease was code for addiction to morphine or other opiates. Given the industrial nature of the Civil War, and the state of medical treatment at the time, the source of the addiction developed from amputations caused by shrapnel wounds.

What disease killed soldiers in ww2?

During WWII, morbidity from such diseases as tuberculosis (anti-tuberculosis agents did not begin to appear until 1949), rheumatic fever, hepatitis and tropical diseases was high and the prime reason for residual disability and time lost from duty.

Was there a white death in ww2?

Simo Häyhä (Finnish: [ˈsimo ˈhæy̯hæ] ( listen); 17 December 1905 – ), often referred to by his nickname, The White Death (Finnish: Valkoinen kuolema; Russian: Белая смерть, romanized: Belaya smert’), was a Finnish military sniper in World War II during the 1939–1940 Winter War against the Soviet Union.

Did ww1 cause diseases?

WWI-related infections such as trench foot, trench fever (caused by louse-borne Rickettsia quintana, subsequently called Bartonella quintana), a range of helminths, intestinal parasites (including Ascaris, Trichuris, Capillaria and Taenia spp.), typhus, cholera, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, dysentery, scarlet fever,