The internal conflict amongst the Creeks soon turned into an all-out war. On August 30, 1813, about 1,000 Red Sticks attacked Fort Mims, northeast of Mobile and killed all the inhabitants. The event sent shockwaves through the Alabama and Mississippi Territories along with Georgia and Tennessee.

What happened to the Creek after the War of 1812?

Creek War, (1813–14), war that resulted in U.S. victory over Creek Indians, who were British allies during the War of 1812, resulting in vast cession of their lands in Alabama and Georgia.

What was a consequence of the Creek War in 1813?

The Creek War was a part of the larger War of 1812 fought between a faction of the Creek tribe and US forces in 1813–14. It resulted in the defeat of the Creek nation and paved the way for the division of the Mississippi Territory into the states of Mississippi and Alabama.

Who conquered the Creeks?

Andrew Jackson

The stunning success of the Red Sticks, played up in the national press as a barbarous attack against Americans, brought the United States into the war. Thus, the Creek civil war became a war of American conquest. The war ended with a decisive victory by Andrew Jackson at Horseshoe Bend in late March 1814.

What happened to the Creek Indians?

The final battle at Horseshoe Bend resulted in the total defeat of the Creek Nation. Subsequently, General Andrew Jackson forced the surviving Creeks to sign the Treaty of Fort Jackson in 1814, ceding much of their ancestral homelands to the U.S. government.

How did the Creek lose their land?

The Red Sticks attacked settlers and loyalist Creeks and the United States struck back with forces led by General Andrew Jackson. Ultimately the Red Sticks lost, and the war ended with the Treaty of Fort Jackson in 1814, which ceded 23 million acres of Creek land to the United States.

Why did the Creek lose their land?

At their peak, the Creeks controlled millions of acres of land in the present-day states of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. Much of this land, however, was lost or stolen as the federal government sought land for white settlement after the American Revolution.

How were the Creeks divided during the War of 1812?

By 1812, internal hostilities engulfed the Creek nation, dividing a once strong tribe into two stratified factions, the Lower Creek, who were generally pro-American, and the Upper Creek, who resisted American interference with their traditional way of life.

Did the Creek get along with the Europeans?

Creek Civil War



During the 18th century, the Creek and the European colonists had gotten along very well, even working as allies. Unfortunately, this all changed after the Americans gained independence.

Why did the Creek War happen?

The war began on August 30, 1813, when a faction of Creeks known as the Red Sticks—because of their red war clubs—attacked American settlers at Fort Mims, near Lake Tensaw, Alabama, north of Mobile. This attack is considered a primary cause of the Creek War.

When did the Creek tribe end?



By 1836 the last of the Creeks surrendered their lands and were taken to Indian Territory to join their progressive kinsmen who had moved a decade earlier. In 1836, 14,609 Creeks journeyed to Oklahoma.

What happened between the Creeks and white Americans?

With independence won, American settlers pushed into Creek homelands of western Georgia and Alabama. The onslaught evoked a series of treaties in which the Creeks ceded lands to the United States. This encroachment split the tribe as factions evolved that both resisted and embraced the expansion of white society.

How much land did the Creeks lose?

22 million acres

Under the terms of the treaty, the Creek Nation ceded nearly 22 million acres to the United States. Jackson justified the seizure of so much territory as payment for the expense of an “unprovoked, inhuman, and sanguinary” war. The Treaty of Fort Jackson (August 9, 1814) ended the Creek War.

When did the Creeks give up their land?



On August 9, 1814, Major General Andrew Jackson, “Old Hickory,” signed the Treaty of Fort Jackson ending the Creek War. The agreement provided for the surrender of twenty-three million acres of Creek land to the United States.

What happened between the Creeks and white Americans?

With independence won, American settlers pushed into Creek homelands of western Georgia and Alabama. The onslaught evoked a series of treaties in which the Creeks ceded lands to the United States. This encroachment split the tribe as factions evolved that both resisted and embraced the expansion of white society.

What happened to the Creek Confederacy?

In the 1830s, the United States forced most members of the Creek Confederacy to vacate their eastern lands and relocate their nation to Indian Territory. Today, their western descendants are known as the Muskogee (Creek) Nation.

When did the Creek tribe end?

By 1836 the last of the Creeks surrendered their lands and were taken to Indian Territory to join their progressive kinsmen who had moved a decade earlier. In 1836, 14,609 Creeks journeyed to Oklahoma.

How did the Creek tribe survive?

Traditional Creek economy was based largely on the cultivation of corn (maize), beans, and squash. Most of the farming was done by women, while the men of the tribe were responsible for hunting and defense. The Creek achieved status based on individual merit rather than by inheriting it.

What is the Creek tribe famous for?



The Creeks were known for their American Indian baskets, sculpture, and glazed pottery. When they had to move to Oklahoma, the Creeks couldn’t get the materials they used to use for some of their traditional crafts, so they concentrated more on other crafts such as beadwork.